Jul 232013
 

5117mwAhWcL._Yeah, not so much a gaming blog post right now, but this entire series would certainly make it into my own Appendix N, along with the works of Joe Abercrombie, so here we go. To bring you up to speed, it’d be better if you’d already read Mister Lynch’s first two books, so I’ll just wait until you’re done.

How amazing was that? The bit with the Spider? I mean, just wow! Ahem, anyway.

Imagine that instead of waiting for the official release of The Republic of Thieves in October, you would have to wait seven whole years. That’s how long I’ve been waiting for this bad boy. Mister Lynch has had some reasonably well documented problems with depression and anxiety, and as such he has been taking just as long as he needs to finish the third part of his Gentlemen Bastards series. I don’t hold it against him; I am lucky enough to have his problems, but I am still very sympathetic.

What made the wait all the worse was that because I work in a bookshop I was constantly seeing publication dates that were never honoured, just extended. But I never gave up hope. I checked weekly on Mr. Lynch’s website, started following him on Twitter and bugged the hell out of the rep who came into the store. Eventually my patience was rewarded, and not long after that I managed to grab hold of an advanced proof copy.

And last night I finished it.

Before I get into the meat of the review, I will say that I will do my damndest to steer clear of spoilers from this latest novel, but I make no such promises about the first two. If you haven’t read them yet, you’ve been warned.

As you can imagine, I had built up a lot of expectation for this one. Seven years is a long time to get excited about a novel. I can say without hesitation though that it lived up to and beyond all my expectations. The return of Locke Lamorra as the self indulgent whiner we know he can become from his time during Red Seas… was handled excellently. After refusing to let his closest friend Jean die at the close of the last book, we begin this one with Locke at death’s door, and Jean doing everything possible to keep Locke firmly ensconced within the land of the living.

Breaking the law is of course included in this, and leads to the opening of the adventure; a story of politics and betrayal, love and loss, crime and vengeance. Throughout all of that, what this story is rally about is relationships. In the last book it was all about Locke and Jean and the deep trusting friendship they share in spite of the troubles that they never seem able to shake. Although this friendship is still very much evident throughout this third installment, the focus rests more on Locke and the woman he loves: Sabetha.

Sticking to his tried and tested formula of interweaving the past with the present, we’re shown how the two love birds first managed to get over their stubbornness and shyness and get together (a long clumsy and embarrassing tale that nevertheless captivates from beginning to end), while also watching their stumbling steps as they try to re-kindle that bright flame of adoration after a five year gap. All this done to either the back drop of young criminals finding a place in the world, or experienced confidence tricksters and thieves rigging the election of a massively powerful city state.

Mr. Lynch knows how to write relationships well. Friendship and betrayal seem to come easy to him, and he easily draws you into the lives of his protagonists. For this reason alone, this book should be required reading for gamers everywhere. We will all remember that time when our wits were as whip-crack fast as Locke and Sabetha’s, and the probably more common times we came up with a perfectly dry zinger that would have put Jean in his place, but just a few seconds/minutes/years too late.

The humour is another great reason to read this book. I lost count of how many times my girlfriend gave me a funny look as I burst out laughing as she sat on the sofa playing the Xbox. Sometimes the humour comes out nowhere and knocks you for six in an otherwise serious scene, sometimes it builds up perfectly until your sat giggling away like a school child. But there are even more reasons to read this book!

It is just full of ideas. Plot fodder galore lines the pages, from subtle ploys to long-game cons that could shape the future of an entire city state. So many things to do in a fantasy city, and with very little effort could lead onto massive plots in pretty much any genre. While we’re here lets talk about genre shall we. The Gentleman Bastards series take place in a Renaissance level world in terms of technology, with a few notable advances to near Victorian levels, and magic filling a few other gaps along the way. The magic, or rather almost total lack thereof, is one of my favourite things about the series. True, we once again get to see some action from the world’s only magic users – the Bondsmagi – but they are so powerful, and so few, that they’re more plot device than set dressing, but not so overpowered that they act as omnipotent MacGuffins. They are used perfectly as a driving force behind the scenes, without much being known about them, even after a very curious Locke starts to ask questions.

As proven in the last book, a quick wit and a good plan is enough to bring at least one of them down. And so we finally come to my favourite reason why you should read this, and all the other books Mr. Lynch has written; they’re stories about human triumph in the face of overwhelming odds. They show the human spirit at its finest, while never shying away from shining a light on its darkest times too. All the better to show the effort and struggle put in to move beyond the depths and once more shine.

To sum up then; buy this book. True, as a role player I can think of a few extra reasons why it’s worth picking up, but everything good about it works no matter who the person is that’s reading it. It is from start to finish a work of wonder, and I say again: very much worth the wait.

  3 Responses to “[Review] The Republic of Thieves by Scott Lynch”

  1. Great review! – Really can’t wait to read the book now

  2. […] [Review] The Republic of Thieves by Scott Lynch (shortymonster.co.uk) […]

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